Syracuse Orange Orangemen - Scouting Report

Syracuse Orange Orangemen - Scouting Report

Crowley Sullivan

Syracuse Orange Orangemen - Scouting Report

Spartans to face Jim Boeheim’s 2-3 matchup zone in Second Round battle on Sunday.

Contact @crowleysullivan

Despite the 82-78 final score of Friday night’s First Round win over a feisty Bucknell Bison team, Michigan State showed its own feistiness, determination, and power and advanced to the Second Round with relative ease.

The Spartans will now square off against Jim Boeheim’s Syracuse Orange on Sunday afternoon at Detroit’s Little Caesar’s Arena for the right to advance to this year’s Sweet Sixteen.

With a win, Tom Izzo would reach his 14th Sweet Sixteen in his 23rd year as Michigan State’s head coach.

Jim Boeheim is looking for his Sweet Sixteen appearance #16 in his 39th season as the head coach at his alma mater.

It’s a matchup of two of the giants of the game – between them there is a total of 1,571 career victories; Boeheim with 820, Izzo with 571.

Boeheim has 57 NCAA Tournament wins (4th all time) with one of those earning him the 2003 National Championship.

Izzo is 7th all time with 48 NCAA Tournament victories and, of course, earned the 2000 National Championship.

For just about all of his 39 years as Syracuse’s head coach, Boeheim has been loyal to a 2-3 matchup zone defense that has stymied opponents.

Can Izzo apply his March Blueprint in such a way that his balanced offensive weaponry can solve the riddle of Boeheim’s zone?

The Spartans have a perimeter game that might be the best Izzo’s ever had to go along with a powerful inside game that should be too much for Boeheim to thwart, no matter what sort of riddle he tries to throw on the floor.

Tyus Battle is a powerful 6’6″ sophomore guard who leads the Orange in scoring with 19.3 per game to go along with three rounds and two assists.

As a 6’8″ freshman forward, Oshae Brissett has brought Boeheim the goods with 15 points and 9 rebounds a game.

Frank Howard adds 14.7 a game as a 6’4″ junior guard.

Other than these three, Boeheim doesn’t have a whole lot of firepower.

The Orange nabbed a spot as one of the First Four teams and enters the game as an 11 seed after eeking its way into the Tournament following a 20-13 regular season that included an 8-10 mark in the ACC.

But with Boeheim, his ability to advance in March has always had as much to do with that mysterious 2-3 matchup zone as it’s had to do with whether or not he’s had a Derrick Coleman or a Carmelo Anthony.

** Editor’s note – the previous sentence is ridiculous in the way it’s off base since Boeheim’s success in March has been solely due to his possession of a Derrick Coleman or a Carmelo Anthony.

Miles Bridges was lights out against Bucknell.  His 29 points, 9 rebounds, and 4 assists were all a part of a performance that should go down in the annals of Michigan State’s storied Tournament history.

However, it was the fire, power, and aggressiveness that Bridges showed – particularly in the second half – that should give Spartan fans the confidence they’re looking for when wondering about the potential for a truly deep run.

As always, we’re here to familiarize you with more than just the personnel competing in the contest.  If you want to know some of the folks who have helped to make Syracuse University tick in order to engage in pithy banter during timeouts – and once Michigan State has put this game away despite Boeheim’s mysterious 2-3 matchup zone – here’s a briefing on the luminaries you need to know about:

Any list of notable Syracuse alumni worth anything starts with Lou Reed. Before he released 20 solo studio albums that helped him achieve fame and fortune, Reed cranked as the frontman for the legendarily transcendent Velvet Underground.  Reed’s rightful place as one of the most progressive, independent, and creative voices in the history of rock music won’t ever be tainted by his passion for heroin.  The fact that he graduated from Syracuse University only adds to the enigmatic nature of the man’s legacy.

Rock on, Orange.

After graduating from Syracuse in 1968, Ian Schrager – with his Syracuse University Sigma Alpha Mu fraternity brother, Steve Rubell – signed the lease for New York’s City’s iconic Studio 54.  After a prolific run with the club, Schrager and Rubell hit a roadblock when, in 1979, the two were charged with tax evasion, obstruction of justice, and conspiracy for reportedly skimming nearly $2.5 million in unreported club receipts.  On February 4th, 1980, Schrager and his Sammy brother Rubell went to prison for nearly a year.  Not to worry, however – on January 17th, 2017, President Barack Obama delivered Schrager with a full, complete, and unconditional Presidential Pardon.

Dance on, Orange.

With a particular flair for writing papers, articles, monographs, and reference books on American legal history that emphasized their focus on the way the American court system addressed slavery and its ramifications on the overall legal ecosystem, Paul Finkelman has made Orange Orangemen proud ever since his graduation from Syracuse University in 1971.  In 2012, Finkelman, with co-editor Donald R. Kennon, edited the wonderfully compelling page turner, “Congress and the Crisis of the 1850s.”  Finkelman must be licking his chops today – plenty of material for him to reconnect with Kennon and get another Congressional assessment out into the marketplace.

Jerry Stiller’s graduation from Syracuse University almost makes me want to pull for the Orange Orangemen.  Stiller needs zero introduction or any SpartansWire biography.

GAME PREDICTION

Too much Miles Bridges for Beoheim’s 2-3 matchup zone.

Too much Cassius Winston for Beoheim’s 2-3 matchup zone.

Too much Matt McQuaid for Boeheim’s 2-3 matchup zone.

Too much Jaren Jackson, Jr for Boeheim’s 2-3 matchup zone.

Too much Joshua Langford for Boeheim’s 2-3 matchup zone.

Too much Nick Ward for Boeheim’s 2-3 matchup zone.

Too much Tom Izzo for Boeheim’s 2-3 matchup zone.

Michigan State – 80

Boeheim’s 2-3 Matchup Zone – 67

Bring on The Dragon…….

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